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Disadvantaged boys benefit most from early school years

Research by Christian Dustmann and Thomas Cornelissen finds that boys from disadvantaged backgrounds benefit most from early schooling, helping to narrow the skills gap (60-80%) with boys from high socio-economic backgrounds.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

UCL News

The Times

The Indepedent

Tes

Housing costs have exacerbated income equality in Germany

CReAM Research by Christian Dustmann and co-authors finds that changes in housing expenditures dramatically exacerbated the rise in income inequality in Germany since the mid-1990s. The research was covered on the German press.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

VoxEU

FAZ

UCL News

Immigrant and disadvantaged children benefit most from early childcare

Attending universal childcare from age three significantly improves the school readiness of children from immigrant and disadvantaged family backgrounds.

Press Release

Discussion Paper

iNews

UCL News

FAZ

VoxEU

 

Brexit

BBC Three Counties

Christian Dustmann discussing Theresa May's comments on EU workers 'jumping the queue' on BBC Three Counties.

CReAM seminar

CReAM - Seminar in Applied Economics Series
Rafael Lalive (University of Lausanne)

Home Sweet Home? Job Search with Commuting and Unemployment Insurance

Event date: Monday 18th March 2019
Time: 4:00-5:30 Place: Christopher Ingold G21 Ramsay LT Speaker Room: 208

Unemployed workers seek jobs that are ideally both well paid and not too far from their homes. But are they willing to compromise on wages and commuting distances as their unemployment spells increase? After a few months of unemployment, we find that job seekers do indeed accept significantly lower paying jobs and also accept jobs that are located further away from their homes. However, based on quasiexperimental variations in the duration of unemployment benefits, we find that the loss of benefits does not explain why the long-term unemployed are willing to commute further from home. In particular, for workers who previously held jobs in the same municipality where they lived (whom we term local workers), unemployment benefits instead raise the commuting distance for the jobs they accepted. We estimate a job search model where job seekers target search in space that has higher costs for searching more remotely. The model predicts that search costs for jobs located both in the home municipality and at a dista nce from home increase over time, but do so relatively more for jobs located in the home municipality. This suggests progressive exhaustion of the pool of good offers close to home. A set of counterfactual policy exercises show that the exhaustion of unemployment insurance benefits reduces the chances to get jobs at a greater distance because the loss of benefits increases the implicit cost of searching further from home.